Ashley Madison Settles Online Data Breach Class Action

online class action lawsuit ashley madisonRemember the Ashley Madison data breach scandal? Well, the website’s parent company may have secured an $11.2 million online class action settlement.

The Infamous Ashley Madison Online Data Breach Scandal

In 2015, hackers unsheathed 36 million accounts on the infamous extra-marital dating site AshleyMadison.com. The fallout was epic — and, at times, tragic; two people took their own lives, divorce proceedings skyrocketed, and the company’s CEO resigned amidst the maelstrom.

Scandal Leads To Online Class Action Lawsuit

The scandal also spawned several legal battles.

Exposed users questioned the platform’s security safeguards. Clients who paid extra for account deletion services took particular umbrage. And beyond the breach, Ashley Madison patrons decried the website’s use of fake profiles to lure clients. Ultimately, the company broke enough proper protocols and client promises to catch an online class action.

A U.S. District Court in Missouri will decide whether or not to affirm the settlement offer — which, by the way, doesn’t include a fault admission on Ashley Madison’s part. If accepted, affected parties can claim up to $3,500, depending on how the breach impacted their lives. For example, people targeted by identity thieves because of the incident will get more than someone who was embarrassed but suffered no material harm as a direct result of the hack. Moreover, amounts will depend on the number of claims submitted.

This class action is not the first legal hurdle AshleyMadison.com has cleared in the wake of the scandal. Thirteen state attorneys general and the Federal Trade Commission also lodged formal complaints against the company.

Connect With An Online Privacy Lawyer

Was your business the target of a data hack? If so, and you’re unsure of subsequent legal obligations, get in touch. Most states require that companies inform affected parties in a particular way. Our team has helped numerous parties navigate the aftermath of a hack. We’ll assist with state and federal notification requirements, plus provide guidance on how to put the incident behind you and continue to grow.

Article Sources

Davis, W. (2017, July 17). Ashley Madison Settles Class-Action Over Data Breach. Retrieved September 03, 2017, from https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/304409/ashley-madison-settles-class-action-over-data-brea.html

Is It Legal To Post Online Reviews Of My Product?

is it legal to post reviews of your own productsCan I post online reviews of my products? The answer: Only if you prominently disclose your connection to the product. It’s against FTC rules to litter the Internet with phony product reviews that appear impartial but aren’t.

Officials regularly execute fake review stings. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission recently censured a trampoline company for the offense.

What happened? Well, a trampoline company — which we’ll call “Acme Bounce” (not real name) — presumably wanted to boost sales. To shorten a long story, representatives from the company allegedly bought some domains. According to reports, those websites were designed to look like impartial-trampoline review sites featuring “expert” advice. “Acme Bounce” regularly received top marks on said sites.

Well, things weren’t necessarily as they appeared. To shorten a long story, according to the FTC, “[One of the trampoline review websites] was operated by [Acme Bounce] and the company owners.” Additionally, some of the comments on the sites were “not authentic,” and instead “created by the owners of [Acme Bounce].”

In the end, “Acme Bounce” had to pay a sizable fine and agree to certain provisions.

The Four Main Rules Of Online Reviews

Steer clear of an FTC online review-related conflict by following these four rules.

  • Don’t write and post reviews of your products under another person’s name to make it appear like it’s a neutral consumer. If you post a review of your own product, the first line of said review should be something along the lines of, “I am {NAME}, the person who sells this product.”
  • If you give your product away in exchange for a fair review, the reviewers must disclose any material benefit received in exchange for posting an “honest opinion.” If you sell on Amazon, note that any type of incentivized review is off limits.
  • Understand that if you hire a marketing company to promote your products, you’re responsible for said promotional company’s actions. The “I didn’t know what they were doing” argument doesn’t work when it comes to unfair and deceptive marketing.
  • Remember: Factual claims made in promotional materials must be backed up with data and test results.

Click here for a full list of online marketing Do’s-and-Don’ts.

Connect With An Online Product Marketing Attorney

Are you grappling with an online marketing or online sales issue? Perhaps you want to avoid future pitfalls and are looking someone to perform and online marketing audit? Either way, our team has considerable experience working with brands and professional marketers. Get in touch today to begin the conversation.

Article Sources

(2017, June 8). FTC Tramples Fake Reviews. Retrieved July 07, 2017, from http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/ftc-tramples-fake-reviews-74147/

Davis, W. (2017, May 31). FTC Charges Trampoline Sellers With Creating Fake Review Sites. Retrieved July 07, 2017, from https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/302115/ftc-charges-trampoline-sellers-with-creating-fake.html

Maine: The Next State To Secure Residents’ Online Privacy?

Maine online privacy lawOnline privacy is becoming a major state’s rights issue. Illinois lawmakers are well on their way to passing a digital data privacy law, and now it looks like Maine is following in The Prairie State’s footsteps.

Maine’s New Online Privacy Bill

A bipartisan proposal marshaled by state Sen. Shenna Bellows of Manchester, L.D. 1610 — a.k.a. “An Act To Protect Privacy of Online Customer Personal Information” — would require Internet Service Providers to secure consent before releasing users’ browsing data.

“This bill prohibits a provider of broadband Internet access service from using, disclosing, selling or permitting access to customer personal information unless the customer expressly consents to that use, disclosure, sale or access.”

Not only does the bill force providers to secure consent before sharing user data, but it also forbids discount for consent programs.

 “Absolutely Appalling”

In March, the United States Congress voted to trash incoming FCC rules prohibiting ISPs and websites from selling user data. Since then, digital privacy has quickly become a “state’s rights” issue. In fact, many jurisdictions are in the process of drafting their own versions of the now-defunct FCC rules.

Keen to avoid more administrative requirements, most ISPs breathed a sigh of relief when Congress killed the browsing privacy rules. Many residents, however, disagreed. In defense of constituents, state Sen. Bellows chastised federal lawmakers, lamenting that the “reckless vote” put “Mainers’ privacy up for sale.” In support of her bill, Bellows remonstrated:

“Most people are rightfully appalled by the idea that their Internet service provider could be watching their every move online and selling their information to the highest bidder. We owe it to our constituents to protect their privacy.”

Maine has a long way to go before L.D. 1610 becomes law — if it even makes it. But the first step on the ratification journey was a public hearing on May 24th.

Connect With An Internet Law Attorney

Kelly / Warner is a boutique Internet law firm that helps clients with various online privacy issues. To learn more about the practice, please start at the “About Us” section of the website.

 

Technology Law News: Common Carrier Loophole Could Benefit Online Business Behemoths

technology law common carrier loopholeThe FTC may score a win, courtesy of the Ninth Circuit. The bench opted to revisit the FTC’s case against AT&T for allegedly throttling customer data. Technology law circles are buzzing about this case because if the judges rule in favor of AT&T, the decision will create an  “oversight loophole.”

FTC v. AT&T: The Telecom Fight Over Governmental Oversight

This case began in 2014 when the FTC sued AT&T, under Section 5 of the FTC Act, over improper disclosures about data throttling practices.  AT&T’s response?  You aren’t the boss of us.

Argument: The FTC Shouldn’t Exercise Oversight of Common Carriers

AT&T argued it was exempt from liability because a portion of the business fell under the status of common carrier. As a result, company lawyers reasoned, the entire organization should be exempt from FTC oversight when it comes to disclosure issues.

The senior vice president of Public Knowledge, Harold Feld said, “[The decision] was huge because it was totally unexpected.  Nobody’s ever ruled that way before.”

Why FTC v. AT&T Is A Big Deal Internet Technology Law Case

Since 1914, the FTC has been “working to protect consumers by preventing anticompetitive, deceptive, and unfair business practices, enhancing informed consumer choice and public understanding of the competitive process, and accomplishing this without unduly burdening legitimate business activity.”

For years, the FTC’s gaze has lingered on Internet-related issues.  But if this case falls in favor of AT&T, the commission could, effectively, lose some proverbial power.  How will larger online companies avoid FTC oversight? They’ll buy a small cellphone company, and voila — regulatory-avoidance mission accomplished.

What The Future Holds If AT&T Wins This Internet Law Case

For the time being, the “common carrier loophole” is plugged while the Ninth Circuit, once again, ponders the case. However, if the court rules in favor of the telecom, it will uncork.

Interestingly, on May 18th, the FTC voted 2-1 to begin eliminating net neutrality rules. The change altered the classification of ISPs as common carriers under the Communications Act.  If officials nix the common carrier classification, AT&T will have to change their defense strategy in its case against the FTC.

Kelly / Warner is a leading Internet law firm that works with tech corporations and Internet Service Providers across the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Asia, and Europe.

Internet Law Issue: Do Moderators Nullify Certain DMCA Immunity Protections?

online moderatorsOnline platforms that feature user-generated content filtered by moderators may have to find other ways to police content if a paparazzo emerges victorious in a current Internet law case.

Do Moderators Disqualify Websites From DMCA Shields?

The suit at the center is Mavrix Photographs, LLC v. LiveJournal, Inc. A Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision found that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s sanctuary clause, which absolves sites of “infringement of copyright by reason of the storage at the direction of a user,” may not provide legal shelter for moderated websites, in certain cases.

Mavrix Photographs — “a celebrity photography company specializing in candid photographs of celebrities in tropical locations” — alleged that LiveJournal — a moderated online journal — violated Mavrix’s copyrights.

Mavrix purports that a community within LiveJournal called “Oh No They Didn’t!” violated the DMCA by posting twenty Mavrix copyrighted images between 2010 and 2014.  ONTD’s content is created and submitted by users, but moderators retain final post privileges; first, a team of volunteer moderators approves posts; then, LiveJournal employees rubberstamp the volunteer-filtered posts.

Appeal’s Court Overturns Decision: Look At Procedures, Not Creators

The Ninth Circuit reversed the lower court’s decision.  The appeal’s bench found that the district court inappropriately focused on who created and approved the material rather than LiveJournal’s content publishing procedures.  The Ninth Circuit also found that factual questions, regarding whether or not LiveJournal moderators acted as agents of LiveJournal, still needed to be addressed.

If the court decrees that LiveJoural’s moderators are agents of the site, LiveJournal could be held liable for copyright infringement over user posts.  The court needs to determine “whether Mavrix’s photographs were indeed posted at the direction of the users in light of the moderators’ role in screening and posting the photographs.”  Moreover, safe harbor stipulations won’t apply if the ONTD moderators are found to be doing more than “merely accessibility-enhancing activities.”

If this case turns out for Mavrix, it could profoundly affect site operations for the majority of semi-moderated platforms.  In fact, many websites may choose to abandon moderation altogether, to avoid potential liabilities.

Contact An Internet Law Attorney

Kelly / Warner is an Internet law firm that works with tech companies, online businesses, and startup entrepreneurs. Our team handles everything from incorporation to IP registration to complex litigation and more. We invite you to learn more about our Internet business legal practice.

Additional Source

Amazon Review Loophole & Feedback Blackmail: E-commerce

Amazon review loophole

Is There A Marketing Loophole When It Comes To Up-Voting Amazon Reviews?

The ever-evolving nature of online business is a source of both excitement and exasperation for entrepreneurs.  Boundaries are repeatedly being pushed — sometimes pitting pioneers against the proverbial “powers that be.”

Take, for example, the semi-recent Amazon review changes. A few months back, a tornado barreled through the e-commerce industry: Amazon had banned incentivized reviews. No longer could sellers offer free products in exchange for honest feedback. Ostensibly, the move hurt companies relying on the technique for product launches.

But instead of throwing in the towel, marketers did what they do best…adjusted. Many started offering “list optimization” and “list maintenance” services.

How did the new system work? Promotions experts enlisted users to up-vote helpful reviews; instead of writing posts, operatives boosted positive reviews.

It was a genius approach; because if you look closely at Amazon’s interface, a question sits at the bottom of each review: “Was this review helpful to you?” Nowhere does it indicate that review-rating is dependent on product purchase. After all, (and theoretically), reviews are tools for potential buyers — and potential buyers find some reviews more helpful than others during the decision making process.

Regardless, Amazon insists its algorithms unearths these types of up-vote networks. “We have machine-learned processes to detect inauthentic customer insights including the manipulation of helpful votes and will ban vendors, sellers, and reviewers who are found to be out of compliance with our policies,” explained a company spokesperson.

Marketing Blackmail: Sabotaging A Listing To Drum Up Business?

A recent New York Post article touched on an Internet law issue, about which we’re also hearing rumblings.

Here’s an excerpt.

The scenarios can get nastier still, according to one merchant who markets skin-care products on Amazon. Asking not be identified for fear of retribution from these vendors, the merchant said his product was a best-seller on Amazon in mid-April, when shoppers were scooping up 450 units a day.

Earlier this month, however, he noticed that all of the negative reviews — about eight of them — were on the top of his page, though the vast majority of his reviews were positive.

The merchant reached out to a “list optimization” vendor who’d previously sent him an e-mail advertising its services. The vendor, whose company the merchant declined to identify, offered to “clean up” his problem for $350 or to provide “listing maintenance” for $1,000 a month.

The skin-care merchant declined the services. The next morning the number of negative votes climbed to 160. On the following day it was 260.

The vendor called him back and suggested that one of the merchant’s competitors — whose positive review votes had, maybe not coincidentally, risen by a lot — was responsible for the negative votes.

The vendor reiterated his offer, upping the cost to $2,000 because the problem had grown exponentially. The vendor also offered to “screw the competitor’s site” according to the merchant.

Blackmailing businesses, via fake review manipulation, undermines “truth-in-advertising” standards and various Federal Trade Commission “unfair and deceptive” marketing rules. If someone is unfairly attacking your website or product listing, in this manner, we may be able to help. Our team has assisted countless businesses with online review issues of this nature.

Want to read more about online feedback legalities? Head over to the consumer review law section.

Illinois On The Brink Of Getting A Digital Data Privacy Law

Illinois online privacy lawFederal lawmakers clobbered the FCC’s digital data disclosure law, but Illinois representatives are nursing a version of it back to health. A digital data privacy measure, if ratified, the Right to Know Act would require most websites and social media platforms to disclose what user data they collect and with whom it’s shared.

Illinois’ Right to Know Act: A Digital Data Privacy Law

Sponsored by State Senator Michael Hastings, the Right to Know Act requires Internet service providers and websites to provide either a working email address or toll-free number that people can use to request information about collected personal data and third parties that received said data.

So far, a version of the bill has passed in the House, and the state’s Senate recently voted 32-21 in favor. It now heads back to a House committee, where it’s expected to be approved.

Federal Data Collection Law Is Dead, But States Are Picking Up The Slack

A Federal Communication Commission digital privacy law, which would have required ISPs to disclose the nature and destination of collected consumer data, was scheduled to go into effect in the coming months.  But in March, the U.S. Congress killed the measure.

States, however, seem to be filling the legislative gap.

The National Conference of State Legislatures revealed that statutes similar to the one in Illinois are being drafted in Alaska and Rhode Island. Plus, about twelve other states are in the early stages of considering some form of online privacy legislation.

Not Everyone Is Thrilled With Illinois Right to Know Act

Online businesses aren’t fans of the act. Opponents argue that a dearth of actual consumer value, coupled with costly administrative excess, make this bill a bad one.

Sen. Chris Nybo explained, “Every technology company [I have] spoken to, from Microsoft to Uber, Lyft…is opposed to this bill.” Nybo also lamented, “I think it sends the wrong message.”

Another subset of politicians is also opposed to the law. Not necessarily because of reasons above, but because they think online privacy issues should be handled on a federal level.

“The federal government has a system of rules and regulations to handle internet traffic,” explained Jason Barickman, a state Senator. “I think we, as one of 50 states, (need) to let them handle those issues and not create additional burdens for our many people and businesses here in Illinois,” he concluded.

Undeterred by detractors, Sen. Hastings, the bill’s sponsor, enthused “I think this is a step forward for Illinois in terms of data privacy. It gives people the right to know what information (Internet companies are) selling to a third party.”

Questions For An Internet Lawyer?

Kelly / Warner works with online businesses and tech entrepreneurs. To learn more about our practice, head here. If you’re ready to speak with an online business attorney, get in touch.

DMCA Safe Harbor Registration Deadline Is Fast Approaching

picture of letters DMCA on deck to accompany post about DMCA digital safe harbor registration

Do you want to be held responsible for other people’s intellectual property missteps? No? Then register for the DMCA Safe Harbor program at dmca.copyright.gov by December 31, 2016. People who previously registered by mail must re-register using the online system. Need help? Contact Kelly / Warner.

Mandatory Online Registration For DMCA Safe Harbor Program

The U.S. Copyright Office changed the DMCA agent registration process. Previously, online service providers could mail in their registration requirements. Not anymore.

By December 31, 2016, all parties wishing to maintain their safe harbor status must register using the online system at dmca.copyright.gov.

The DMCA Safe Harbor Provision

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) governs online intellectual property in the United States. Section 512(c), commonly known as the “Safe Harbor” program, outlines how ISPs can protect themselves from third-party intellectual property liability.

To put it another way, the DMCA Safe Harbor program is why authorities don’t punish Google when *John Doe* posts a pirated film on YouTube.

DMCA Designated Agents

The DMCA Safe Harbor program isn’t an automatic protection bestowed on all websites. To qualify, every three years, ISPs must formally designate and register an agent — typically an attorney — who acts as the receiver for all site-specific intellectual property notifications and takedown requests.

What happens if you don’t register a DMCA agent? Authorities could hold you responsible for users’ intellectual property foibles. So, if you’re an OSP, and you don’t want to pay the price for users’ actions, register for the DMCA Safe Harbor program.

Social Media Marketing Maven: Chrissy Teigen

picture of social media icons on phone to accompany post about Chrissy Teigen's social media marketing prowessWhen she’s not lip sync battling, Chrissy Teigen apparently ponders social media marketing mysteries! Recently, the brand influencer Twitter-shared some musings about FTC advertising compliance.

We learned:

  • Chrissy Teigen is serious about her online marketing work and keeps up-to-date with FTC regulations. We say, “Good on her!” Every influencer should familiarize themselves with Federal Trade Commission compliance standards.
  • Chrissy collaborates with brands to draft promotional tweets.
  • Teigen, (like many marketers), doesn’t quite understand why some tea and smoothie social media influencers seem allergic to #ad or #spon promotional hashtags, which are, technically, required.

The FTC’s social media marketing rules

  • Promotional Hashtags: Influencers, marketers, and brands are expected to use #ad, #spon, #sponsor, or #paid in promotional tweets, ‘grams, and other social media posts.
  • Disclose Material Relationships: Read the Dot Com Disclosures to determine the necessary promotional declarations for your product. Don’t want to wade through an FTC regulatory document? Click here for the most important points.
  • Be Mindful of Promotional Language: Don’t lie about product benefits; don’t fib about ingredients; don’t rely on questionable scientific studies to support claims. The FTC has — and will continue to — sue over these types of infractions.

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram promotions are ubiquitous, but online marketing regulations are still nascent. Please don’t misunderstand the assertion. Regulations DO exist; brands risk sizable fines for shirking guidelines. And even though the FTC has earned a reputation for, shall we say, mutable justice… consistency has, over the past year, quietly snuck its way into the investigation equation.

Want to evade the FTC’s prying eyes?  Clean up your marketing compliance house.

Click here to read about other digital promotional legalities. Head this way to speak with someone who can help solve your social media marketing challenges.

Ebook Business Update: Discount-For-Review Exemptions and Pricing Wars

Graphics of books on a laptop screen to accompany a blog post about the ebook business

Ebook Business Legal News: Authors Can Still Give Out Free Advanced Copies Of Books, In Exchange For Honest Reviews

Did you hear about the changes in Amazon’s online review policy? Basically, sellers can no longer offer free or discounted products in exchange for fair and honest reviews.

Alas, dear writers, there is an exception: ebooks!

Since Gutenberg first pimped his press to the public, authors have given out free advanced copies in exchange for reviews; the practice is the publishing industry’s primary marketing artery. (Think about it: Who would’ve plunked down dimes for the then unknown Thoreau’s Walden, if it didn’t include a forward by his bud, the popular Ralph Emerson?)

How can sellers leverage the ebook exemption in Amazon’s discount-for-review policy? It depends on the product. For example, service providers reliably attract new clients by developing niche ebooks. Ask yourself: Can you do the same for your product?

Ebook Business Performance News: Digital v. Paper Pricing Wars Lumber On

For years, paper publishers and Amazon have unwittingly found themselves in a polygamous marriage. Sure, certain benefits keep them happily bound (Amazon is the country’s largest book distributor), but the relationship is also plagued with heaps of jealousy, resentment, suspicion, and, of course, power struggling.

The Brinkmanship Of Book Pricing

It all started when Amazon successfully hooked readers on ebooks, and the paper-book market took the bullet; bookstores were lined up in front of a firing squad.

But traditionalists fought back. In an arguably injudicious move — which perhaps revealed the old-industry-guard’s detrimental and intractable shortsightedness — the paper publishers sued for the right to set ebook pricing…and won.

But it was a Pyrrhic Victory, of sorts.

Why?

Because Amazon buys books at wholesale and still controls paperback / hardback pricing on the site. So, when the publishers hiked ebook costs, Amazon started pushing paper books at a lower-than-retail cost. And now, according to a recent article in Tech Crunch, ebook sales are down 22.7% compared to 2015. (Ay, Dios libro! Can’t the publishers all just get along!?)

Nice To Meet You

Self-published authors regularly become entangled in intellectual property confrontations; plagiarism is also a big problem — as are writers who deploy phony defamatory reviews to disparage competitors.

We help authors overcome these obstacles. If you’re grappling with an online publishing business or legal problem, we’re here to help. Get in touch; we’ll chat and come up with solutions to your ebook business challenges.

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Cyberbullying Case: Fatal Harassment Leads To 30-Day Jail Sentence

cyberbullying case law jail

Cyberbullying Case Summary: Fatal NJ University Incident

In 2010, Rutgers University student Tyler Clementi tragically jumped to his death after learning his roommate, Dharun Ravi, secretly recorded footage of him kissing another man, and then posted it online.

The State of New Jersey used bias intimidation laws to prosecute Ravi (State of New Jersey vs. Dharun Ravi) in the seminal cyberbullying case. In 2012, a court convicted him on 15 counts. Ravi “was sentenced to 30 days in jail, 3 years probation, 300 hours of community service, a $10,000 fine, and counseling on cyberbullying and alternate lifestyles.”

Judge Ordered Retrial

In 2015, however, New Jersey’s Supreme Court put an end to the state’s bias intimidation law, declaring it unconstitutional. The legal dominoes fell, and in 2016, an appeals court ordered a new trial, since four of Ravi’s counts stemmed from an unconstitutional edict.

Despite the decision, judges in the cyberbullying case emphatically condemned Ravi’s actions and presented an emotional opprobrium:

“The social environment that transformed a private act of sexual intimacy into a grotesque voyeuristic spectacle must be unequivocally condemned in the strongest possible way. The fact that this occurred in a university dormitory, housing first-year college students, only exacerbates our collective sense of disbelief and disorientation.”

Interested in reading more cyberbullying case studies? Click here.

Online Gaming Threats: Chat Ultraviolence Leads To Jail

online gaming threats

Can you land in legal trouble over online gaming threats? Let’s talk about the issue for two minutes.

Can I Go To Jail Over Aggressive Smack Talk During Online Game play?

Law enforcement officials treat criminal threats like the Supreme Court treats the Constitution — seriously. Plus, FBI identity and tracking tools can smoke the average person from a digital foxhole fairly easily.

How much time could you catch, if caught? Bodily harm threats could fetch a five-year prison sentence; property damage, two years.

When Does Trash Talking Become An Actionable Threat?

The second someone implies, or outright threatens to abuse, rape, stalk, hit, or kill, the legal line has been crossed. Play it safe: keep your smack talk about the match.

Some people make good on their threats. If anybody starts polluting chats with creepy posts, pick up the phone and call your local precinct; they’ll hook you up with the nearest FBI contact, who will take the matter very seriously.

Unsolicited advice nugget: if you plan to go pro, there’s a worldwide audience to worry about. Past statements can — and often do — come back to haunt — especially in today’s digital thunder dome. Don’t let online gaming threats destroy your career.

Can you give me an example of someone who has been arrested for online gaming threats?

Authorities arrested a 28-year-old Heroes of the Storm player (who allegedly also runs a Facebook account called ‘tedbundyismygod1’) for littering the game’s chat — and his Facebook — with ultraviolence threats including:

“I will bomb the new york twin towers [sic]”

“You make me want to shoot up an elementary school;”

He also threatened to “rape and kill” children.

Other players reported the disturbing posts on July 7th; by July 12th, authorities had the alleged culprit in custody.

What should I do if someone threatens me, via chat, during a match?

The same rules apply to online gaming as they do airports: If you see something, say something!

Let’s be frank: unhinged people carry out threats. If somebody starts polluting chats with creepy posts, pick up the phone and call your local precinct; they’ll hook you up with the nearest FBI contact, who will take the matter very seriously.

Got An eSport Issue?

Need professional advice about online gaming threats or another eSport business issue? Internet law firm Kelly / Warner has a top-rated team dedicated to eSport legalities. Let’s talk.