Tag Archives: Media Regulations

Can A Business Be Sued For Giving Themselves Great Online Reviews?

yelp-logo
Here’s another one from the “fake testimonials” file — but this time, the tables are turned. Instead of a business trying to sue Yelp over a scathing review, Yelp is suing a law firm for allegedly posting fake – yet glowing – reviews under their own entry. Yes, my friend, you read that correctly: Yelp is now on the hunt for businesses that are padding their pages with adulatory, although ultimately phony, testimonials. (Maybe Yelp is tired of angry business owners looking to pick a fight over user reviews?) The timing of this case is almost prescient, as New York State recently passed a ground-breaking law which categorizes faux-laudatory reviews – especially ones you and your employees write yourselves – as false advertising, and therefore illegal. Law firm Being Sued by Yelp for Fake, Positive Online Reviews This Yelp v. ...
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ISP Operator Refuses To Comply With Administrative Subpoenas; Can He Be Prosecuted?

political defamation lawsuit filed
A Utah ISP operator is engaging in a little civil disobedience when it comes to warrant-less subpoenas. He contends they’re unconstitutional – and he may have a point. But if state prosecutors pursue action against the ISP, they may end up shooting themselves in the foot. A tricky legal standoff, indeed. ISP Provider Says, “No Way” To Warrant-less Subpoenas Internet service providers are   often asked by law enforcement officials — and prosecutors — to provide information about their users. Since the Internet has become an integral part of our daily existence, many states have passed laws that allow for expeditious turnaround times for subpoenas requesting identifying information from ISPs. Most jurisdictions achieved this by authorizing the use of administrative subpoenas, which eliminate the need for a judge’s approval. Utah has a warrant-less subpoena policy. Enacted in 2009, the law has ...
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Avoid Getting Your Defamation Lawsuit Dismissed

defamation litigation information
Former UCLA basketball player Reeves Nelson’s defamation lawsuit against Sports Illustrated was recently dismissed by the Los Angeles Superior Court. The case stemmed from an article written by Pulitzer Prize winning author George Dohrmann entitled “Not The UCLA Way.” It appeared in the March 5, 2012 edition of the magazine. I haven’t read the article, but according to reports, Dohrmann characterized Nelson as a player with “poor behavior” who was let go from the team because of it. Not pleased with the description, Nelson filed a defamation lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court. To make a long story short, the judge ruled that Dohrmann had done extensive research and did not defame the athlete. The defamation case was dismissed. Possible Reasons Why A Disparaging Statement May Not Be Defamatory In order to win a defamation lawsuit in the United States, ...
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The Internet Radio Fairness Act: What’s It All About? What Will It Change?

internet-radio
After years of paying incredibly high royalty fees, it looks like Internet radio stations, like PANDORA, are in store for a big break in the way of the Internet Radio Fairness Act. If passed, the act will lower the amount of fees that online music streaming services must pay. The Current Rates For Internet Radio Compared To Satellite Many Internet laws are ancient in comparison to Web’s growth rate. The current Internet radio royalty regulations are one such example. Passed into law 14 years ago – when AOL discs still arrived daily in the mail – and updated in 2007, the current law requires Internet radio service providers to pay about 2 cents per listener per hour or 25% gross – whichever is higher. To give you an idea, PANDORA, in the second quarter alone, paid $60.5 million in royalties, ...
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MediaCare: Supreme Court Rules on Media Ownership

media laws
Last month, the United States Supreme Court upheld rules that placed limits on media ownership. The statutes forbade one entity from owning both broadcast outlets and newspapers in local markets. While the rules in place limit ownership of print and broadcast products, websites are still considered a piece of the main media company rather than a medium on its own. Does the Internet Level the Playing Field When It Comes To Media Ownership Regulations? Some believe that the proliferation of the Internet should result in more lenient media ownership rules. Others, however, think that even though the Internet has somewhat leveled the media playing field, broadcast media companies still enjoy certain benefits. Let’s take one small example – legal classifieds. While the rules are slightly different from state to state, most have legislation in place that governs what type of ...
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